Review: Turtles All the Way Down by John Green

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Review: Turtles All the Way Down by John GreenTurtles All the Way Down by John Green
Narrator: Kate Rudd
Length: 7 hrs
Published by Listening Library on October 10, 2017
Genres: Contemporary
Format: Audiobook
Source: Publisher
AmazonThe Book DepositoryAudible
Goodreads
four-stars

It all begins with a fugitive billionaire and the promise of a cash reward.

Turtles All the Way Down is about lifelong friendship, the intimacy of an unexpected reunion, Star Wars fan fiction, and tuatara. But at its heart is Aza Holmes, a young woman navigating daily existence within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.

In his long-awaited return, John Green shares Aza’s story with shattering, unflinching clarity.

John Green can be seriously divisive in the YA book blogging community. Though I do not love all his books, I’ve loved a couple of them a whole lot, and I do consider myself a fan (though, yes, sometimes he says things that are frustrating). I really like his prose, pretentious though it may be. Turtles All the Way Down didn’t really sound like a Christina book, but I was too curious not to read it when the audiobook came into my hands. Turtles All the Way Down has been years in the making, and it’s really good.

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Review: Otherworld by Jason Segel & Kirsten Miller

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Review: Otherworld by Jason Segel & Kirsten MillerOtherworld by Jason Segel, Kirsten Miller
Narrator: Jason Segel
Length: 10 hrs, 33 mins
Series: Otherworld #1
Published by Listening Library on October 31, 2017
Genres: Science Fiction
Format: Audiobook
Source: Publisher
AmazonThe Book DepositoryAudible
Goodreads
half-star

For fans of Black Mirror and HBO's Westworld, and readers of James Dashner and Veronica Roth, Otherworld is the first book in New York Times bestselling authors Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller's new YA sci-fi-thriller series. The future is now. And the future is terrifying.

There are no screens. There are no controls. You don't just see and hear it--you taste, smell, and touch it too. In this new reality, there are no laws to break or rules to obey. You can live your best life. Indulge every desire.
It's a game so addictive you'll never want it to end. Until you realize that you're the one being played.
Welcome to Otherworld, where reality is dead. Step into the future. Leave your body behind.

The frightening future that Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller have imagined is not far away. Otherworld asks the question we'll all soon be asking: if technology can deliver everything we want, how much are we willing to pay?

Though the premise  for Otherworld didn’t exactly set my world on fire, I was actually rather excited to get the audiobook. Segel and Miller’s prior effort together, the Nightmares! series, was actually pretty good, and Segel’s narration for it was really fun to listen to, despite not being super my thing. Otherworld is more pertinent to my interests than the middle grade series, so I thought I’d like this quite a bit. Unfortunately, I was dead wrong. Otherworld lacks in originality and also offended me the whole way through.

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Size Doesn’t Matter (204): Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy; The Written World; A World Without “Whom”

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Size Doesn’t Matter (204): Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy; The Written World; A World Without “Whom”Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy by Tim Harford
Narrator: Roger Davis
Length: 9 hrs, 15 mins
Published by Penguin Audio on August 29, 2017
Genres: Nonfiction, Economics
Format: Audiobook
Source: Publisher
AmazonThe Book DepositoryAudible
Goodreads
four-stars

A lively history seen through the fifty inventions that shaped it most profoundly, by the bestselling author of The Undercover Economist and Messy.

Who thought up paper money? What was the secret element that made the Gutenberg printing press possible? And what is the connection between The Da Vinci Code and the collapse of Lehman Brothers?

Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy paints an epic picture of change in an intimate way by telling the stories of the tools, people, and ideas that had far-reaching consequences for all of us. From the plough to artificial intelligence, from Gillette’s disposable razor to IKEA’s Billy bookcase, bestselling author and Financial Times columnist Tim Harford recounts each invention’s own curious, surprising, and memorable story.

Invention by invention, Harford reflects on how we got here and where we might go next. He lays bare often unexpected connections: how the bar code undermined family corner stores, and why the gramophone widened inequality. In the process, he introduces characters who developed some of these inventions, profited from them, and were ruined by them, as he traces the principles that helped explain their transformative effects. The result is a wise and witty book of history, economics, and biography.

Before this, I’m pretty sure I’ve never read a book about economics (and I know I’ve been bored to tears by fantasies more focused on economics) for fun before. And, actually, Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy was a lot of fun.

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Cover Snark (246): Not the Snark You’re Looking For

Welcome to Cover Snark, where the people are snarky and the covers quiver in fear. Since I don’t write many snarky book reviews here on A Reader of Fictions, Cover Snark is my outlet. If you click on the title of the book, where possible, I’ve linked to Goodreads. Clicking on the cover itself will show you the cover in a larger size, in most cases. Feel free to love covers I hate and vice versa. Let me know your thoughts in the comments!

Please note that you should by no means contact the author if you do not like their cover; they likely have ZERO control. Feel free to express opinions of the covers in the comments, but please do not @ an author on Twitter because of anything you’ve seen here.

Shiny and New:

1. All Out: The No-Longer-Secret Stories of Queer Teens Throughout the Ages – Saundra Mitchell, ed.

Thoughts: HOLY FUCK. This may be the most gorgeous Harlequin Teen cover ever.

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Size Doesn’t Matter (203): Spinning; Keeping the Moon

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Size Doesn’t Matter (203): Spinning; Keeping the MoonSpinning by Tillie Walden
Published by First Second on September 12, 2017
Genres: Memoir
Pages: 400
Format: ARC
Source: Publisher
AmazonThe Book Depository
Goodreads
three-stars

It was the same every morning. Wake up, grab the ice skates, and head to the rink while the world was still dark.
Weekends were spent in glitter and tights at competitions. Perform. Smile. And do it again.

She was good. She won. And she hated it.

For ten years, figure skating was Tillie Walden’s life. She woke before dawn for morning lessons, went straight to group practice after school, and spent weekends competing at ice rinks across the state. Skating was a central piece of her identity, her safe haven from the stress of school, bullies, and family. But as she switched schools, got into art, and fell in love with her first girlfriend, she began to question how the close-minded world of figure skating fit in with the rest of her life, and whether all the work was worth it given the reality: that she, and her friends on the team, were nowhere close to Olympic hopefuls. The more Tillie thought about it, the more Tillie realized she’d outgrown her passion—and she finally needed to find her own voice.

I requested Spinning because I was interested in the ice skating and the f/f. This memoir, however, while dealing with both of these subjects wasn’t so much about them. Spinning is about the world of competitive skating, and how it took all of the fun out of skating for Walden.

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