Series Review: Because You’ll Never Meet Me by Leah Thomas

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Series Review: Because You’ll Never Meet Me by Leah ThomasBecause You'll Never Meet Me by Leah Thomas
Series: Because You'll Never Meet Me #1
Published by Bloomsbury USA Childrens on June 2, 2015
Genres: Science Fiction, Contemporary
Pages: 344
Format: Hardcover
Source: Publisher
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four-stars

In a stunning literary debut, two boys on opposite ends of the world begin an unlikely friendship that will change their lives forever.

Ollie and Moritz are best friends, but they can never meet. Ollie is allergic to electricity. Contact with it causes debilitating seizures. Moritz’s weak heart is kept pumping by an electronic pacemaker. If they ever did meet, Ollie would seize. But Moritz would die without his pacemaker. Both hermits from society, the boys develop a fierce bond through letters that become a lifeline during dark times—as Ollie loses his only friend, Liz, to the normalcy of high school and Moritz deals with a bully set on destroying him.

A story of impossible friendship and hope under strange circumstances, this debut is powerful, dark and humorous in equal measure. These extraordinary voices bring readers into the hearts and minds of two special boys who, like many teens, are just waiting for their moment to shine.

Because You’ll Never Meet Me has been on my shelves, taunting my failure, for well over a year. I grabbed a copy of the sequel at ALA annual to force myself to get to this book, hoping that I would like it and not hate myself for grabbing book two.  Because You’ll Never Meet Me is one of those debuts that’s so well done that it’s hard to believe it’s Thomas’ first book. High concept, emotional, and beautifully written, there’s so much to love about Because You’ll Never Meet Me.

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Size Doesn’t Matter (127): Updraft; French Lessons; Wonders of the Invisible World

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Size Doesn’t Matter (127): Updraft; French Lessons; Wonders of the Invisible WorldUpdraft by Fran Wilde
Series: Bone Universe #1
Published by Tor Books on September 13, 2016
Genres: Fantasy
Pages: 384
Format: Paperback
Source: Publisher
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three-half-stars

Welcome to a world of wind and bone, songs and silence, betrayal and courage.

Kirit Densira cannot wait to pass her wingtest and begin flying as a trader by her mother's side, being in service to her beloved home tower and exploring the skies beyond. When Kirit inadvertently breaks Tower Law, the city's secretive governing body, the Singers, demand that she become one of them instead. In an attempt to save her family from greater censure, Kirit must give up her dreams to throw herself into the dangerous training at the Spire, the tallest, most forbidding tower, deep at the heart of the City.

As she grows in knowledge and power, she starts to uncover the depths of Spire secrets. Kirit begins to doubt her world and its unassailable Laws, setting in motion a chain of events that will lead to a haunting choice, and may well change the city forever-if it isn't destroyed outright.

If I were a poet, I would write an ode to the redesign of this series. Many odes. Tor has some of the most gorgeous cover art out there. Though I don’t love the book as much as I love the cover, it accurately captures the majesty and breathtaking nature of the world within Updraft.

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Size Doesn’t Matter (126): Like a River Glorious; Leopard at the Door

I received this book for free from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Size Doesn’t Matter (126): Like a River Glorious; Leopard at the DoorLike a River Glorious by Rae Carson
Series: The Gold Seer Trilogy #2
Published by Greenwillow on September 27, 2016
Genres: Historical, Western, Paranormal
Pages: 416
Format: eARC
Source: Edelweiss
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Goodreads
three-stars

He will never stop hunting me down. I have to end him, and soon.

Lee Westfall survived the dangerous journey to California. She found a new family in the other outcasts of their wagon train, and Jefferson, her best friend, is beginning to woo her shamelessly. Now they have a real home—one rich in gold, thanks to Lee’s magical ability to sense the precious metal in the world around her.

But Lee’s Uncle Hiram has survived his own journey west. He’s already murdered her parents, and he will do anything to have Lee and her talents under his control. No one is safe. When he kidnaps her, she sees firsthand the depths of his depravity.

Lee’s magic is changing, though. It is growing. The gold no longer simply sings to her—it listens. It obeys her call. Will that alone be enough to destroy her uncle?

If I had to describe Like a River Glorious in one word, it would be anticlimactic. Walk the Earth a Stranger had brilliant pacing and was full of adventure. In tone, Like a River Glorious is completely different. It is the most three star of all three star reads.

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Review: The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Review: The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine LowellThe Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell
Published by Touchstone on March 1, 2016
Genres: Contemporary, Romance, Fantasy
Pages: 352
Format: Hardcover
Source: Publisher
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Goodreads
four-half-stars

In this smart and enthralling debut in the spirit of The Weird Sisters and Special Topics in Calamity Physics, the only remaining descendant of the Brontë family embarks on a modern-day literary scavenger hunt to find the family's long-rumored secret estate, using clues her eccentric father left behind.

Samantha Whipple is used to stirring up speculation wherever she goes. As the last remaining descendant of the Brontë family, she's rumored to have inherited a vital, mysterious portion of the Brontë's literary estate; diaries, paintings, letters, and early novel drafts; a hidden fortune that's never been shown outside of the family.

But Samantha has never seen this rumored estate, and as far as she knows, it doesn't exist. She has no interest in acknowledging what the rest of the world has come to find so irresistible; namely, the sudden and untimely death of her eccentric father, or the cryptic estate he has bequeathed to her.

But everything changes when Samantha enrolls at Oxford University and bits and pieces of her past start mysteriously arriving at her doorstep, beginning with an old novel annotated in her father's handwriting. As more and more bizarre clues arrive, Samantha soon realizes that her father has left her an elaborate scavenger hunt using the world's greatest literature. With the aid of a handsome and elusive Oxford professor, Samantha must plunge into a vast literary mystery and an untold family legacy, one that can only be solved by decoding the clues hidden within the Brontë's own writing.

A fast-paced adventure from start to finish, this vibrant and original novel is a moving exploration of what it means when the greatest truth is, in fact, fiction.

Going into The Madwoman Upstairs, I wasn’t in the mood. I’d been planning to read a historical romance novel, but the ebook was checked out from the library. Grumpily, I picked up The Madwoman Upstairs, which has been judging me from my needs review shelf for almost a year (I try, but sometimes I do not succeed in timely fashion). Immediately, I fell in love with this book, which was not the dry literary novel I feared (I remain haunted by Charlie Lovett’s First Impressions). The Madwoman Upstairs bursts with vibrancy, humor, and literary criticism.

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Cover Snark (217): The Witch Who Came in from the Snark

Welcome to Cover Snark, where the people are snarky and the covers quiver in fear. Since I don’t write many snarky book reviews here on A Reader of Fictions, Cover Snark is my outlet. If you click on the title of the book, where possible, I’ve linked to Goodreads. Clicking on the cover itself will show you the cover in a larger size, in most cases. Feel free to love covers I hate and vice versa. Let me know your thoughts in the comments!

Please note that you should by no means contact the author if you do not like their cover; they likely have ZERO control. Feel free to express opinions of the covers in the comments, but please do not @ an author on Twitter because of anything you’ve seen here.

Shiny and New:

1. The Witch Who Came In from the Cold Season One – Lindsay Smith, Max Gladstone, Cassandra Rose Clarke, Ian Tregillia, & Michael Swanwick

Thoughts: The covers for this SerialBox series have been on point, and this is no exception.

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