Audiobook Review: A Slip of the Keyboard by Terry Pratchett

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Audiobook Review: A Slip of the Keyboard by Terry Pratchett

A Slip of the Keyboard: Collected Nonfiction by Terry Pratchett
Narrator: Michael Fenton Stevens
Published by Random House Audio on September 23, 2014
Duration: 9 hrs, 8 mins
Genres: Humor, Nonfiction
Format: Audiobook
Source: Publisher
AmazonThe Book DepositoryAudibleGoodreads

A collection of essays and other non fiction from Terry Pratchett, spanning the whole of his writing career from his early years to the present day. 

Terry Pratchett has earned a place in the hearts of readers the world over with his bestselling Discworld series -- but in recent years he has become equally well-known and respected as an outspoken campaigner for causes including Alzheimer's research and animal rights. A Slip of the Keyboard brings together for the first time the finest examples of Pratchett's non fiction writing, both serious and surreal: from musings on mushrooms to what it means to be a writer (and why banana daiquiris are so important); from memories of Granny Pratchett to speculation about Gandalf's love life, and passionate defences of the causes dear to him.

With all the humour and humanity that have made his novels so enduringly popular, this collection brings Pratchett out from behind the scenes of the Discworld to speak for himself -- man and boy, bibliophile and computer geek, champion of hats, orangutans and Dignity in Dying.

Collected nonfiction is a phrase that would generally send me running for the hills. Sure there’s good nonfiction. I was a freaking history major even, but nonfiction is pretty close to my last choice when it comes to pop culture. However, I make exceptions for really cool people, like Terry Pratchett. I’m not a Discworld fan to the degree that I attend Discworld cons (in fact, tbh, I didn’t know they existed until I listened to this book), but I own quite a few and will own more as soon as I get time to binge a 40 book series. I will not, however, be purchasing a print copy of this book so I can keep it in my collection.

(more…)

Review: Good Morning Call by Yue Takasuka

Review: Good Morning Call by Yue Takasuka

Good Morning Call by Yue Takasuka
Series: Good Morning Call #1-11
Published by Shueisha on 1997
Genres: Contemporary, Romance
Format: eBook
Source: Scanlation
three-half-stars

AmazonGoodreads
Nao Yoshikawa stays behind to live by herself when her parents leave to inherit her grandpa's farm in the country. On the day she moves into her new apartment, she discovers that it was rented also to Hisashi Uehara--a cute, super-cool, popular guy from her school. Not only did their housing agency unexpectedly close down, the landlord of the apartment tells them that they had to pay more for their apartment than they had expected. With no money and no home to return to, Nao and Hisashi decide to live together as flatmates.

As I’ve gotten back into the habit of reading manga again, I’ve been rereading some old favorites. Rereading is always an interesting endeavor, because you never really know how things will hold up to your memories. Or at least, I don’t, what with my memory not being the most reliable thing ever. Good Morning Call was one of my favorites back in my initial manga reading. While I definitely still enjoy it, I can definitely admit it’s not one of the best shojo manga out there.

(more…)

Audiobook Review: The Tell-Tale Start by Gordon Mc Alpine

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Audiobook Review: The Tell-Tale Start by Gordon Mc Alpine

The Tell-Tale Start by Gordon McAlpine
Series: The Misadventures of Edgar & Allan Poe #1
Narrator: Arte Johnson
Published by Listening Library on January 15, 2013
Duration: 3 hrs. 14 mins
Genres: Adventure, Humor, Mystery
Source: Publisher
two-half-stars

AmazonThe Book DepositoryAudibleGoodreads
Meet Edgar and Allan Poe -- twelve-year-old identical twins, the great-great-great-great-grandnephews of Edgar Allan Poe. They look and act so much alike that they're almost one mischievous, prank-playing boy in two bodies. When their beloved black cat, Roderick Usher, is kidnapped and transported to the Midwest, Edgar and Allan convince their guardians that it's time for a road trip. Along the way, mayhem and mystery ensue, as well as deeper questions: What is the boys' telepathic connection? Is Edgar Allan Poe himself reaching out to them from the Great Beyond? And why has a mad scientist been spying on the Poe family for years?

With a mix of literary humor, mystery, and a little quantum physics, this series opener is a perfect choice for smart, funny tweens who love the Time Warp Trio, Roald Dahl, and Lemony Snicket.

Alright, guys. This is going to ACTUALLY be a short review. I thought about not reviewing this one, since I don’t have much to say about it, but other people do mini reviews and they can be a nice change of pace, so let’s do this thing.

The Tell-Tale Start wasn’t on my radar at all, but it showed up highlighted in an email about Halloween audiobooks, so I figured I’d give it a shot, because it was short and I’m willing to experiment with audiobooks. I liked it enough to want to finish, but not enough to want to read more. Now I’m going to break it down bullet point style.

  • Really liked the little turf war between Shakespeare and Poe in the afterlife. The way they mock each other is delightful. It also made me think affectionately of Poe from the Croak trilogy by Gina Damico, which I can relate to almost anything.
  • Liked the connection between the twins and the consideration of its applications. I’m not sure how much this will be appreciated by the middle grade audience, but the way these two literally know what the other is thinking at all times is pretty cool, and I like that McAlpine really considered the implications of this.
  • Confused by why the twins talked aloud to one another so much if they knew everything they were thinking already. Though I suppose it would have been creepy if they never communicated with one another out loud.
  • Reminded of how the Weasley twins must have been when they were wee humans, performing pranks and generally being a nuisance. Of course, they would be way more lovable than the Poes.
  • Disappointed at how much I don’t care about the characters. The POV is distancing. Roderick the cat is obviously the best character.
  • Annoyed by the fact that Arte Johnson isn’t a very good narrator, at least for this listener. Whenever he read a line as the twins, I cringed.

The Tell-Tale Start was well worth the three hours it took from my life, but it’s also really not my kind of middle grade.

Tl;dr – Review in a GIFfy:

gif i tried to take over the world sabrina

Review: Rebound by Noelle August

I received this book for free from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Review: Rebound by Noelle August

Rebound by Noelle August
Series: Boomerang #2
Published by William Morrow on February 10, 2015
Pages: 288
Genres: Contemporary, Romance
Format: eARC
Source: Edelweiss
three-stars

AmazonThe Book DepositoryGoodreads
At Boomerang, one night can change everything . . .

Adam Blackwood has it all. At twenty-three he's fabulously wealthy, Ryan Gosling-hot, and at the top of his game in the business world. His life is perfect until a scandal from his past resurfaces and threatens to knock the tech wunderkind down and throw his company, Boomerang--a hook-up site for millennials--into chaos.

Alison Quick, the twenty-one-year-old daughter of a business tycoon--and the ex-girlfriend of Boomerang's former intern, Ethan--has a problem of her own. After nearly flunking out in her senior year of college, she has one chance to redeem herself to her father by proving that she deserves a place in his corporate empire. That means spearheading her father's plan to sink big money into Adam's company and launch it into the stratosphere--provided Adam has no skeletons in his closet.

When the two meet, their sizzling chemistry makes it tough to keep things strictly professional. But when Alison discovers Adam's secret, she knows she should bring it right to her father, who'll leverage it for his own gain and use it to ruin Adam. The only problem: she's falling for Adam--hard.

Will earning her father's approval come at the price of losing her first real love? Or can Adam and Alison leave behind past mistakes and conquer the world--together?

Boomerang has been one of the most successful new adult novels with the YA blogger community. I read it and I liked it, particularly for the humor. That actually shined for me more than the romance did. Since I’m always up or another romance, or almost always anyway, I couldn’t resist requesting Rebound, despite some hesitation about this match. Rebound turned out to be another good read, and, in my opinion, better than Boomerang on some levels.

(more…)

Cover Snark (134): Garden of Dreams and Snark

CoverSnarkChristina2

Welcome to Cover Snark, where the people are snarky and the covers quiver in fear. Since I don’t write many snarky book reviews here on A Reader of Fictions, Cover Snark is my outlet. If you click on the title of the book, where possible, I’ve linked to Goodreads. Clicking on the cover itself will show you the cover in a larger size, in most cases. Feel free to love covers I hate and vice versa. Let me know your thoughts in the comments!

Shiny and New:

1. The Broken Hearts’ Society of Suite 17C – Leigh Ann Kopans
The Broken Hearts’ Society of Suite 17C - Leigh Ann Kopans
Thoughts: I like that they’ve moved past grief and into anger. They definitely look like they’re plotting the murder of whoever broke their hearts.

(more…)